Global Impact Award

Excellent news last week that the Co-op won The Hermes Global Impact Award at the Retail Week Awards.

Championing Fairtrade products, contributing to local community, launching the Bright Future programme to help victims of Modern Slavery, recycling and the Future of Food strategy were all called out as examples of what puts Co-op ahead of most other businesses.

One of the judges said: “If it was about a single initiative or a campaign there were good entries, but in terms of multiple initiatives over time and the aggregate impact they have, the Co-op just stands out on its own. “The grocer shines a light on important issues like slavery and water – not always the ones that are popular. There’s a pure intent. Tackling modern slavery by offering a path back into employment is a great approach.”

Another judge commented: “The Co-op consistently delivers. It’s cultural across its business – the grocer doesn’t just talk about it, it lives and breathes it.  The Co-op has a strong, genuine sense of duty and community. It is properly entwined with every part of the organisation and it deserves to be properly recognised for that. The Co-op is staying true to its purpose of ‘championing a better way of doing business’, which makes it the worthy winner of this award.”

Reading these plaudits is most encouraging, and having just spent this morning reviewing the 2018 Co-op Way sustainability report at the Risk and Audit Committee, I know we have plenty more positive news to report on the sustainability front.  I was particularly pleased that the Committee met once again with our assurance providers, DNV, and that we considered their report at the same time as our draft financial accounts for the last year.  This to me symbolises the way that we give equal weight to our ethical and financial performance, recognising that the two can and should reinforce each other in a virtuous circle of creating a stronger Co-op the more we can be seen to be contributing to stronger communities and a more sustainable world.

Future of Food

 

Reflecting on the past year, one of things of which I am most proud is the Co-op’s development of our “Future of Food” strategy.  Building on many years of pioneering ethical and responsible sourcing of products, we have been working hard to revitalise our commitments for the next decade and beyond.  In a world where we are all challenged by issues of environmental sustainability, its great to see us setting ambitious targets to build on our existing strengths in conjunction with our partners, taking action on what matters most.

Our goals revolve around three areas:

  • Sourcing products that are created with respect for people and planet – sustainability, health, reduced waste, reduced use of plastics, agricultural innovation.
  • Treating people fairly – working for justice in supply chains through more Fairtrade, empowering vulnerable workers and women, tackling water poverty, supporting British farmers and ensuring that all our suppliers get a fair deal.
  • Learning and celebrating together – educating and empowering future generations to make informed choices, working with partners and sharing good practice, helping everyone understand the true value of food.

Our programmes and plans have been developed after a lot of consultation with our supply partners, NGOs and academic experts as well as colleagues in all parts of our business. Having attended several workshops around this process as well as the launch event, I have been impressed by the hugely positive feedback they have given about the Co-op difference they can already see and our qualitatively stronger commitment to partnership.

You can read about our plans in much more detail on our website:  https://food.coop.co.uk/food-ethics/future-of-food

Sustainability reporting

In Manchester yesterday to meet with DNV GL – the assurance firm that works with the Co-op Group on our annual Sustainability report.

Social reporting at Traidcraft

I am a fan of such reports as a way of encouraging companies to take more action about their impacts on society and the environment and as an important form of transparency.  At Traidcraft we were an early pioneer of social reporting and won many prizes for initiatives in this area.  I found producing social accounts a really effective way of keeping the organisation focused on our wider mission goals and non-financial impacts. I learned that social and sustainability reports need to be set up in a way that will be effective as a real business tool and a force for change and improvement – rather than being seen as a public relations vehicle addressed largely to an audience of sustainability experts as is too often the case.

Co-op sustainability reports

Co-op’s reports have over the years been seen as leading the way in good practice reporting, and they certainly make very interesting reading (see https://www.co-operative.coop/ethics/sustainability-report to read the 2015 report, published in the autumn of 2016).

2015 Co-op Sustainability report

Lots of evidence in here of the Co-op putting its ethical principles into practice across our engagement with supply chains, local communities, environmental impact and colleagues/members.  Really encouraging to see the data set out clearly, some really impressive examples of what we have been delivering, and it’s good to be able to identify areas where we could still do better too.

Revitalising the Co-op Way

However, even at the Co-op there is scope to make improvements to our approach, if we want sustainability targets and reporting to be truly as embedded in the organisation as our financial and commercial goals. And although we have continued to place a lot of emphasis on sustaining our ethical trading principles, as you would expect, we have to recognise that improving our reporting and systems has not been a major focus of attention during the Rescue and Rebuild phases of the Co-op’s turnaround, when we have (rightly) had to focus on restoring our basic viability as a business that can serve its members well.

But we are now in a position to move on from that stage. So it is great that we have been putting a lot of effort over the past year into revitalising our ethical principles through the work of the Coop Way Policy working groups, where senior colleagues and Council members have worked together to review and update our ethical policies across the board.  We have also identified the key strategic areas on which the Group Board needs to be held to account by the Members’ Council in the work on setting a “Co-op Compass”, and these include demonstrating leadership in delivering social impact.  These welcome initiatives now need to be worked through into our business planning prepare for our Renewal phase from 2018-2020.

Sustainability reports and targets

As a member of the Board’s Risk and Audit Committee I am encouraging work to improve the profile of our Sustainability Report and ensure it gets the in-depth attention it deserves.  I would like to see us setting a smaller number of longer-term (say 3 to 5 year) targets focusing on those areas where we think we can make a big difference and that are core to the nature of our work.  Of course we would still need to monitor, track and improve many other social and environmental indicators as well, to ensure we are delivering good practice across the board in line with our values and principles.  But by setting longer-term plans and targets in a number of key areas we are more likely to be able to integrate our aspirations more fully into our resource allocation and planning. And that will be the key to making real change happen.

I am encouraged that the Co-op’s team is also beginning to develop new systems to measure our impact as well as our activity, which is an area in which most sustainability reports are relatively weak: if we get this right we will reinforce our reputation as a trail blazer in sustainability reporting.