Final Fairtrade Fortnight update

Coffee with Mike Gidney – CEO of the Fairtrade Foundation (pictured above) – was an excellent chance to catch up with an old colleague and to mull over possible future initiatives for Fairtrade. We met in Esquires cafe in Durham – which as you can see was appropriately merchandised to support the fortnight.

We were particularly interested to discuss how to make careers in ethical food more accessible to students – recognising that for many the first steps in a career path would be in larger company where they could learn skills, but that retaining a focus on ethics in their early careers could then sometimes be challenging. We generated ideas around co-ordination of internship placements by the Foundation, creating positive peer support groups and tying more ethical inputs into initiatives such as Grocery Girls being promoted by the Food CEO of the Co-op, Jo Whitfield.

We also spent time reflecting on the Grocery Code Adjudicator, whose establishment Mike and I both campaigned for when at Traidcraft, and the irony that she was currently investigating the Co-op’s buying practices when Co-op was probably amongst the most ethical of all retailers. Although we await the outcome of those investigations, we both agreed that the focus all retailers were now having to put on handling supplier relationships better was a major step forward. The improvements in god practice across the major retailers in the last two years have really been very marked. However, the scope of the Code was limited to UK suppliers at the moment, so did not really provide direct help to Fair-trade and other overseas producer groups – perhaps that’s a next stage to campaign for.

And then on Friday I was at the AGM of Shared Interest – an organisation that lends to fair trade producers who cannot access commercial finance, and on whose Board I have served for four years. It had been an encouraging year for Shared Interest, and it was inspiring to hear of the impact that well-judged lending could have in equipping small groups for expansion that could extend fair trade benefits to hundreds more workers. But chatting to other supporters – many also keen members of the Co-op – it was also clear that they remain disappointed by the degree to which our stores can get behind Fairtrade Fortnight. There are practical and logistical barriers to be overcome, but I think they are right that we need to try harder in future years.

Fairtrade Fortnight pledge

Take the Co-op Fairtrade Pledge and help some of the world’s poorest farmers

Fairtrade Fortnight is underway (25 Feb – 10 March) and I’m asking our Co-op members and customers to make a commitment to Fairtrade that will help some of the poorest farmers in the world get a fairer chance in life. 

All you have to do is take the ‘Co-op Fairtrade Pledge’ by swapping a regular product you buy for a Fairtrade alternative. 

It could be a chocolate bar, a bottle of wine, a jar of coffee or packet of biscuits. It’s a simple switch, but if all Co-op members and customers did this it would make a huge difference to people’s lives giving them greater financial security and the chance to improve education and healthcare for their communities.

Famous for Fairtrade

At the Co-op we’ve been famous for Fairtrade for decades. That’s because we believe it’s the ‘gold standard’ for an ethical trading relationship which addresses poverty and exploitation and gives the farmers themselves control and choice over how they use the money they earn.

The Fairtrade mark means farmers are guaranteed a fair price for their goods and are cushioned against dramatic changes in world markets – like the crash in cocoa prices that took place in 2016. In West Africa, where 60% of cocoa beans are grown, that price crash means families are struggling to survive. 

I’m pleased to say that all the cocoa we use in our Co-op chocolate and as an ingredient in any Co-op product is 100% Fairtrade. That means our cocoa farmers have been able to maintain their livelihoods. 

And our commitment goes well beyond cocoa.    

While other retailers are stepping back from Fairtrade and introducing alternative ethical schemes that cause shoppers confusion, at the Co-op we’re staying true to the values the Fairtrade mark stands for. 

Women leaders

But we always want to do more. So over the last year we’ve increased our commitment to women cocoa farmers in West Africa. We’re funding the Fairtrade Africa’s Womens’ leadership school projects, which are working with women in Côte d’Ivoire to empower them as future leaders. 

The projects train them in business skills such as decision making, resource management and leadership. We’re also working with Kuapa Kokoo, a cocoa growing co-op in Ghana, to give their women workers access to training.

Take the pledge

By taking the Co-op Fairtrade Pledge you’ll be playing your part to make trade fairer for some of the most disadvantaged communities in the world. And you’ll discover how fantastic Fairtrade products taste. If you’re planning any Fairtrade events where you live Tweet @coopuk so we can spread the word. 

Fairtrade Fortnight – Co-op’s cocoa initiative

In the last week it has been great to catch up at various events with Mike Gidney, Chief Executive of the Fairtrade Foundation who for many years used to work with me at Traidcraft where he used to be Director of Policy while I was chief exec.

Mike Gidney               Fairtrade mark

Update on Fairtrade

Mike was able to share the good news that the value of Fairtrade sales in the UK rose slightly in 2016 despite the challenges posed by changes in the EU sugar regime which have severely hit Fairtrade sugar sales.  Given food price deflation, the underlying volume growth (which matters most to producers) was about 8%.

At one event a producer from Divine Chocolate (or rather from Koapa Kokoo the co-operative which owns and supplies Divine), impressed Co-op Group staff with her simple explanation of how selling cocoa on Fairtrade terms had allowed her community to achieve clean water, build a school and provide decent toilets for themselves.

Co-op’s cocoa initiative

But for me the stand-out event of the fortnight has been Co-op Group’s announcement that from May 2017 all the cocoa in any of our own brand products (not just the chocolate bars) will in future be sourced on Fairtrade terms. We are the first business in the world to make a commitment like this, and it means our purchases of Fairtrade cocoa will go up an impressive five-fold, with an extra £500,000 per annum in Fairtrade premiums flowing through to our producer suppliers on top of the value of the coca sales themselves.  Co-op is challenging other businesses to follow suit, as this is how we can really achieve scale of impact.

Chocolate report

It is a source of justifiable pride that Co-op is still leading the way in Fairtrade – perhaps particularly after the disappointing announcement that the Fairtrade logo will shortly disappear from Cadbury’s Dairy Milk (shame on them!).  I am pleased to have been able to play a small part by providing Board-level encouragement for our commitment to Fairtrade, but the credit must go to our Fairtrade sourcing manager Brad Hill whose commitment and focus over many years has been absolutely exemplary.