Final Fairtrade Fortnight update

Coffee with Mike Gidney – CEO of the Fairtrade Foundation (pictured above) – was an excellent chance to catch up with an old colleague and to mull over possible future initiatives for Fairtrade. We met in Esquires cafe in Durham – which as you can see was appropriately merchandised to support the fortnight.

We were particularly interested to discuss how to make careers in ethical food more accessible to students – recognising that for many the first steps in a career path would be in larger company where they could learn skills, but that retaining a focus on ethics in their early careers could then sometimes be challenging. We generated ideas around co-ordination of internship placements by the Foundation, creating positive peer support groups and tying more ethical inputs into initiatives such as Grocery Girls being promoted by the Food CEO of the Co-op, Jo Whitfield.

We also spent time reflecting on the Grocery Code Adjudicator, whose establishment Mike and I both campaigned for when at Traidcraft, and the irony that she was currently investigating the Co-op’s buying practices when Co-op was probably amongst the most ethical of all retailers. Although we await the outcome of those investigations, we both agreed that the focus all retailers were now having to put on handling supplier relationships better was a major step forward. The improvements in god practice across the major retailers in the last two years have really been very marked. However, the scope of the Code was limited to UK suppliers at the moment, so did not really provide direct help to Fair-trade and other overseas producer groups – perhaps that’s a next stage to campaign for.

And then on Friday I was at the AGM of Shared Interest – an organisation that lends to fair trade producers who cannot access commercial finance, and on whose Board I have served for four years. It had been an encouraging year for Shared Interest, and it was inspiring to hear of the impact that well-judged lending could have in equipping small groups for expansion that could extend fair trade benefits to hundreds more workers. But chatting to other supporters – many also keen members of the Co-op – it was also clear that they remain disappointed by the degree to which our stores can get behind Fairtrade Fortnight. There are practical and logistical barriers to be overcome, but I think they are right that we need to try harder in future years.

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