Final Fairtrade Fortnight update

Coffee with Mike Gidney – CEO of the Fairtrade Foundation (pictured above) – was an excellent chance to catch up with an old colleague and to mull over possible future initiatives for Fairtrade. We met in Esquires cafe in Durham – which as you can see was appropriately merchandised to support the fortnight.

We were particularly interested to discuss how to make careers in ethical food more accessible to students – recognising that for many the first steps in a career path would be in larger company where they could learn skills, but that retaining a focus on ethics in their early careers could then sometimes be challenging. We generated ideas around co-ordination of internship placements by the Foundation, creating positive peer support groups and tying more ethical inputs into initiatives such as Grocery Girls being promoted by the Food CEO of the Co-op, Jo Whitfield.

We also spent time reflecting on the Grocery Code Adjudicator, whose establishment Mike and I both campaigned for when at Traidcraft, and the irony that she was currently investigating the Co-op’s buying practices when Co-op was probably amongst the most ethical of all retailers. Although we await the outcome of those investigations, we both agreed that the focus all retailers were now having to put on handling supplier relationships better was a major step forward. The improvements in god practice across the major retailers in the last two years have really been very marked. However, the scope of the Code was limited to UK suppliers at the moment, so did not really provide direct help to Fair-trade and other overseas producer groups – perhaps that’s a next stage to campaign for.

And then on Friday I was at the AGM of Shared Interest – an organisation that lends to fair trade producers who cannot access commercial finance, and on whose Board I have served for four years. It had been an encouraging year for Shared Interest, and it was inspiring to hear of the impact that well-judged lending could have in equipping small groups for expansion that could extend fair trade benefits to hundreds more workers. But chatting to other supporters – many also keen members of the Co-op – it was also clear that they remain disappointed by the degree to which our stores can get behind Fairtrade Fortnight. There are practical and logistical barriers to be overcome, but I think they are right that we need to try harder in future years.

More Fairtrade Fortnight activities

Just back from giving a talk at Cullercoats Methodist Church on Saturday. We had an audience of about fifty church members and Co-op members/supporters, and the event was organised by Co-op Council member Mark Ormston. Those attending included Sir Alan Campbell, the local MP and Deputy Chief Whip of the Labour Party, and Dan Crowe – Vice-President of the Co-op’s National Members’ Council.

Mark Ormston, myself and Sir Alan

I gave a very brief overview of the development of the Fair Trade movement and then talked about some of the key product categories sold by Co-op: wine, sugar and chocolate/cocoa. I was able to give some colour to my illustrations be describing from my own experience at Traidcraft how producers of these types of product often choose to use Fairtrade benefits. We discussed in particular education, access to clean and safe water and creating opportunities for women.

I then talked about the challenges in Fairtrade at the moment, with reference to the decisions of Cadbury’s, Nestle and Sainsbury’s to drop the Fairtrade Mark from some of their key product lines. We also discussed the commercial problems that Traidcraft has recently faced.

My message was to take heart from the fact that new commitments to Fairtrade were still being made: Waitrose has just announced that it has taken all its chocolate confectionery Fairtrade (something Co-op has done for many years fo course!). And Fairtrade has still had a huge impact on these big organisations, and that big corporates now had to take sustainability very much more seriously. Nestle, Cadbury’s and Sainsbury’s all still were pursuing ethical sourcing schemes, and often applying them now across their whole supply chains rather than just on Fairtrade lines. Whilst these schemes were less impactful in depth, they brought benefits to many millions more producers.

But I then emphasised that we need to keep Fairtrade thriving so that the pressure to run these schemes continued and that everyone had a part to play. As consumers our individual buying choices mattered and send important signals to companies – we should never underestimate how much our own purchases matter: so keep buying Fairtrade (and see my call for taking up the Co-op Fairtrade Pledge on my blog below!).

We can also all join in campaigns and petitions – such as Fairtrade Foundation’s current campaign for a living wage for all cocoa farmers in Ivory Coast. I could show form my own experience how just a few thousand campaign postcards could be enough to get a meeting with a minister of European Commissioner to press for change.

And finally I encouraged people to carry on buying from the fair trade pioneers such as Traidcraft, Divine, Cafedirect and Liberation Foods (as well as buying Co-op Fairtrade products, since Co-op convenience stores could only stock a limited range of their goods). The pioneers are needed to keep standards high, to enthuse and mobilise supporters at grassroots level and to push forward innovation in Fairtrade.

Interestingly this was the first talk on Fairtrade that I had given with a Co-op rather than an exclusively Traidcraft emphasis. What struck me forcefully was just what a difference Co-op and Traidcraft working in partnership together has made – the first Cafedirect products on supermarket shelves, the first fair-trade wine, pioneering of new categories such as charcoal and rubber gloves, sourcing fair trade coffins from Bangladesh. And Co-op has also partnered with Divine since 2000 when it took all its own brand chocolate Fairtrade boring with Divine’s Kuala Kokoo co-operative. Partnerships like this are a great expression of Co-operation in practice – and they really work!

Also in the last week I gave a talk to students at St Chad’s College on Fairtrade matters and ran my own Traidcraft stall at our local church. And we are still only half way through Fairtrade Fortnight!

Sustainability reporting

In Manchester yesterday to meet with DNV GL – the assurance firm that works with the Co-op Group on our annual Sustainability report.

Social reporting at Traidcraft

I am a fan of such reports as a way of encouraging companies to take more action about their impacts on society and the environment and as an important form of transparency.  At Traidcraft we were an early pioneer of social reporting and won many prizes for initiatives in this area.  I found producing social accounts a really effective way of keeping the organisation focused on our wider mission goals and non-financial impacts. I learned that social and sustainability reports need to be set up in a way that will be effective as a real business tool and a force for change and improvement – rather than being seen as a public relations vehicle addressed largely to an audience of sustainability experts as is too often the case.

Co-op sustainability reports

Co-op’s reports have over the years been seen as leading the way in good practice reporting, and they certainly make very interesting reading (see https://www.co-operative.coop/ethics/sustainability-report to read the 2015 report, published in the autumn of 2016).

2015 Co-op Sustainability report

Lots of evidence in here of the Co-op putting its ethical principles into practice across our engagement with supply chains, local communities, environmental impact and colleagues/members.  Really encouraging to see the data set out clearly, some really impressive examples of what we have been delivering, and it’s good to be able to identify areas where we could still do better too.

Revitalising the Co-op Way

However, even at the Co-op there is scope to make improvements to our approach, if we want sustainability targets and reporting to be truly as embedded in the organisation as our financial and commercial goals. And although we have continued to place a lot of emphasis on sustaining our ethical trading principles, as you would expect, we have to recognise that improving our reporting and systems has not been a major focus of attention during the Rescue and Rebuild phases of the Co-op’s turnaround, when we have (rightly) had to focus on restoring our basic viability as a business that can serve its members well.

But we are now in a position to move on from that stage. So it is great that we have been putting a lot of effort over the past year into revitalising our ethical principles through the work of the Coop Way Policy working groups, where senior colleagues and Council members have worked together to review and update our ethical policies across the board.  We have also identified the key strategic areas on which the Group Board needs to be held to account by the Members’ Council in the work on setting a “Co-op Compass”, and these include demonstrating leadership in delivering social impact.  These welcome initiatives now need to be worked through into our business planning prepare for our Renewal phase from 2018-2020.

Sustainability reports and targets

As a member of the Board’s Risk and Audit Committee I am encouraging work to improve the profile of our Sustainability Report and ensure it gets the in-depth attention it deserves.  I would like to see us setting a smaller number of longer-term (say 3 to 5 year) targets focusing on those areas where we think we can make a big difference and that are core to the nature of our work.  Of course we would still need to monitor, track and improve many other social and environmental indicators as well, to ensure we are delivering good practice across the board in line with our values and principles.  But by setting longer-term plans and targets in a number of key areas we are more likely to be able to integrate our aspirations more fully into our resource allocation and planning. And that will be the key to making real change happen.

I am encouraged that the Co-op’s team is also beginning to develop new systems to measure our impact as well as our activity, which is an area in which most sustainability reports are relatively weak: if we get this right we will reinforce our reputation as a trail blazer in sustainability reporting.

Water for Africa

At the Co-op support centre in Manchester again this week, and attended a moving presentation and video about the work Co-op is supporting to bring clean water to communities  in Africa.

Every litre of our own brand “Fairbourne Springs”water raises 3p for OneFoundation’s work – and over the ten years we have had this link we have raised over £7 million.  And now we are extending the scheme to our own-brand flavoured waters too, which should increase donations by 30% a year.

fairbourne-water

The video showed examples of the work carried out in Malawi.  this brought back memories for me of visits there with Traidcraft, and especially of one village where our fair trade premiums had been used for a bore hole.  When I asked one of the village women about the benefits I was told “now we have safe water”.  I assumed this meant it was a clean and healthy source rather than a potentially polluted river.  But no.  It was safe because they no longer had to risk going past the crocodiles to get to the river – with villagers regularly being attacked and one or two deaths each year.

ellisie

Makes you realise just how lucky we are in this country to have clean water literally on tap.   Another great example of what makes me proud to be part of the Co-op – and why would you choose any other water when you are in one of our shops?