Global Impact Award

Excellent news last week that the Co-op won The Hermes Global Impact Award at the Retail Week Awards.

Championing Fairtrade products, contributing to local community, launching the Bright Future programme to help victims of Modern Slavery, recycling and the Future of Food strategy were all called out as examples of what puts Co-op ahead of most other businesses.

One of the judges said: “If it was about a single initiative or a campaign there were good entries, but in terms of multiple initiatives over time and the aggregate impact they have, the Co-op just stands out on its own. “The grocer shines a light on important issues like slavery and water – not always the ones that are popular. There’s a pure intent. Tackling modern slavery by offering a path back into employment is a great approach.”

Another judge commented: “The Co-op consistently delivers. It’s cultural across its business – the grocer doesn’t just talk about it, it lives and breathes it.  The Co-op has a strong, genuine sense of duty and community. It is properly entwined with every part of the organisation and it deserves to be properly recognised for that. The Co-op is staying true to its purpose of ‘championing a better way of doing business’, which makes it the worthy winner of this award.”

Reading these plaudits is most encouraging, and having just spent this morning reviewing the 2018 Co-op Way sustainability report at the Risk and Audit Committee, I know we have plenty more positive news to report on the sustainability front.  I was particularly pleased that the Committee met once again with our assurance providers, DNV, and that we considered their report at the same time as our draft financial accounts for the last year.  This to me symbolises the way that we give equal weight to our ethical and financial performance, recognising that the two can and should reinforce each other in a virtuous circle of creating a stronger Co-op the more we can be seen to be contributing to stronger communities and a more sustainable world.

More Fairtrade Fortnight activities

Just back from giving a talk at Cullercoats Methodist Church on Saturday. We had an audience of about fifty church members and Co-op members/supporters, and the event was organised by Co-op Council member Mark Ormston. Those attending included Sir Alan Campbell, the local MP and Deputy Chief Whip of the Labour Party, and Dan Crowe – Vice-President of the Co-op’s National Members’ Council.

Mark Ormston, myself and Sir Alan

I gave a very brief overview of the development of the Fair Trade movement and then talked about some of the key product categories sold by Co-op: wine, sugar and chocolate/cocoa. I was able to give some colour to my illustrations be describing from my own experience at Traidcraft how producers of these types of product often choose to use Fairtrade benefits. We discussed in particular education, access to clean and safe water and creating opportunities for women.

I then talked about the challenges in Fairtrade at the moment, with reference to the decisions of Cadbury’s, Nestle and Sainsbury’s to drop the Fairtrade Mark from some of their key product lines. We also discussed the commercial problems that Traidcraft has recently faced.

My message was to take heart from the fact that new commitments to Fairtrade were still being made: Waitrose has just announced that it has taken all its chocolate confectionery Fairtrade (something Co-op has done for many years fo course!). And Fairtrade has still had a huge impact on these big organisations, and that big corporates now had to take sustainability very much more seriously. Nestle, Cadbury’s and Sainsbury’s all still were pursuing ethical sourcing schemes, and often applying them now across their whole supply chains rather than just on Fairtrade lines. Whilst these schemes were less impactful in depth, they brought benefits to many millions more producers.

But I then emphasised that we need to keep Fairtrade thriving so that the pressure to run these schemes continued and that everyone had a part to play. As consumers our individual buying choices mattered and send important signals to companies – we should never underestimate how much our own purchases matter: so keep buying Fairtrade (and see my call for taking up the Co-op Fairtrade Pledge on my blog below!).

We can also all join in campaigns and petitions – such as Fairtrade Foundation’s current campaign for a living wage for all cocoa farmers in Ivory Coast. I could show form my own experience how just a few thousand campaign postcards could be enough to get a meeting with a minister of European Commissioner to press for change.

And finally I encouraged people to carry on buying from the fair trade pioneers such as Traidcraft, Divine, Cafedirect and Liberation Foods (as well as buying Co-op Fairtrade products, since Co-op convenience stores could only stock a limited range of their goods). The pioneers are needed to keep standards high, to enthuse and mobilise supporters at grassroots level and to push forward innovation in Fairtrade.

Interestingly this was the first talk on Fairtrade that I had given with a Co-op rather than an exclusively Traidcraft emphasis. What struck me forcefully was just what a difference Co-op and Traidcraft working in partnership together has made – the first Cafedirect products on supermarket shelves, the first fair-trade wine, pioneering of new categories such as charcoal and rubber gloves, sourcing fair trade coffins from Bangladesh. And Co-op has also partnered with Divine since 2000 when it took all its own brand chocolate Fairtrade boring with Divine’s Kuala Kokoo co-operative. Partnerships like this are a great expression of Co-operation in practice – and they really work!

Also in the last week I gave a talk to students at St Chad’s College on Fairtrade matters and ran my own Traidcraft stall at our local church. And we are still only half way through Fairtrade Fortnight!

Fairtrade Fortnight pledge

Take the Co-op Fairtrade Pledge and help some of the world’s poorest farmers

Fairtrade Fortnight is underway (25 Feb – 10 March) and I’m asking our Co-op members and customers to make a commitment to Fairtrade that will help some of the poorest farmers in the world get a fairer chance in life. 

All you have to do is take the ‘Co-op Fairtrade Pledge’ by swapping a regular product you buy for a Fairtrade alternative. 

It could be a chocolate bar, a bottle of wine, a jar of coffee or packet of biscuits. It’s a simple switch, but if all Co-op members and customers did this it would make a huge difference to people’s lives giving them greater financial security and the chance to improve education and healthcare for their communities.

Famous for Fairtrade

At the Co-op we’ve been famous for Fairtrade for decades. That’s because we believe it’s the ‘gold standard’ for an ethical trading relationship which addresses poverty and exploitation and gives the farmers themselves control and choice over how they use the money they earn.

The Fairtrade mark means farmers are guaranteed a fair price for their goods and are cushioned against dramatic changes in world markets – like the crash in cocoa prices that took place in 2016. In West Africa, where 60% of cocoa beans are grown, that price crash means families are struggling to survive. 

I’m pleased to say that all the cocoa we use in our Co-op chocolate and as an ingredient in any Co-op product is 100% Fairtrade. That means our cocoa farmers have been able to maintain their livelihoods. 

And our commitment goes well beyond cocoa.    

While other retailers are stepping back from Fairtrade and introducing alternative ethical schemes that cause shoppers confusion, at the Co-op we’re staying true to the values the Fairtrade mark stands for. 

Women leaders

But we always want to do more. So over the last year we’ve increased our commitment to women cocoa farmers in West Africa. We’re funding the Fairtrade Africa’s Womens’ leadership school projects, which are working with women in Côte d’Ivoire to empower them as future leaders. 

The projects train them in business skills such as decision making, resource management and leadership. We’re also working with Kuapa Kokoo, a cocoa growing co-op in Ghana, to give their women workers access to training.

Take the pledge

By taking the Co-op Fairtrade Pledge you’ll be playing your part to make trade fairer for some of the most disadvantaged communities in the world. And you’ll discover how fantastic Fairtrade products taste. If you’re planning any Fairtrade events where you live Tweet @coopuk so we can spread the word. 

2017 AGM

Just back from the Co-op AGM in Manchester.  This was an inspiring event, with a good turnout of members, impressive debut speech from our new Chief Executive Steve Murrells and a great sense of an organisation now back in a stable position and beginning to think more about areas in which we can challenge the status quo as well as extend our trading.

  For me there were four particular highlights:

1. Modern Slavery

We gave great attention to our new commitment to leading work on Modern Slavery.  It was horrific to learn that there are thought to be 21 million victims of slavery worldwide – more than at any other time in history.  And it is estimated that there are 10,000 slaves in the UK today.  We are committed at the Co-op not only to working hard to ensure that our supply chains are free of this scourge, but to providing survivors with paid employment to help restore their dignity and sense of self worth.  There was a powerful and emotional video sharing the story of one of the three former slaves who have been given permanent employment by Co-op, together with a commitment to taking on 30 more this year working with two charities (City Hearts and Snowdrop) in our Bright Future initiative.  It was great to get an endorsement from members of our plans to campaign to encourage other companies to do likewise.

2. Fairtrade

This is a picture of me with Brad Hill, who heads up the Co-op’s Fairtrade work.

More good news on the Co-op’s commitment to Fairtrade, with our volumes of FT sales (18.5% up on last year) now over-taking Tesco’s to make us the second largest Fairtrade retailer in the UK.  Only Sainsbury’s sells more, and with their momentum appearing to wane it is clear that our support for the movement is increasingly crucial.  Our focus on maximising impact for producers is driving our new initiatives.  Having taken all the cocoa in own brand products Fairtrade this year, we are now going to do the same with tea, coffee and bananas.  So not only will these product categories continue to be 100% Fairtrade, but we will always source them on fair trade terms when they are used as ingredients in other products too.

It was also great to hear that because of our work with One Foundation (donating 3 pence per litre on sales of our bottled waters to water projects in Kenya and Malawi) we are the only UK retailer to be invited to join a new UN backed initiative (the Global Investment Fund for Water) to promote clean water.

3. Waste and recycling

New commitments on making all our food packaging recyclable by 2023 (though there is perhaps still more to do on reducing packaging).  We will also be working with FareShare to redistribute the food for 20 million meals.  These are great initiatives – although in my view we still need to do more to tackle the root problems behind food waste.

It was also great to see the Co-op’s first hybrid diesel/electric powered lorry outside the conference centre!  It is the only 26 tonne lorry of this type in the UK, and we are trialling it as a way of improving fuel efficiency and reducing noise.

4. Community engagement

The launch of our Member Pioneer scheme, which over time will lead to 1500 activists working in the localities we serve to mobilise our members behind improving the well-being of their communities.  About 60 Pioneers have been recruited so far (from 450 applicants) and we have started to train and resource them.

Lemn Sissay, the poet and Chancellor of Manchester University, has agreed to be Ambassador for the scheme, and gave a rousing speech on the importance of communities and also on our embracing migrants and refugees (recognising that migration is part of all our stories and integral to being human).  This initiative promises to make our community support even more meaningful than the money given to good causes:  £9 million distributed just last month as a result of our 5+1 membership scheme, and a further £6 million raised to fight against loneliness with the Red Cross (nearly double our target figure).  I hope tackling loneliness will become a big feature of our local work going forward – with hard evidence that nothing does this better than encouraging people to volunteer and become engaged with local initiatives.

Re-elected!

Oh, and then there was the good news that I have been re-elected for a second term as Member Nominated Director!  Although the voting numbers weren’t announced formally at the meeting I am told that I received over 40,000 of the first preference votes, with the other two candidates being on just under 20,000 each.  I am humbled and delighted by this endorsement, and look forward to the next two years of serving the Society.

Tackling loneliness together

The Co-op Group and British Red Cross have formed a partnership to tackle the issue of loneliness in the UK, and launched a research report on the subject yesterday.  This has highlighted that loneliness is not just an issue for older people, but can affect people of all age and backgrounds. The media have particularly picked up the fact that new mums are especially vulnerable to feeling isolated while looking after their young children – but there are many other affected groups.

loneliness-report            loneliness-presentation

For the Co-op loneliness is an issue of relevance to many parts of our family of businesses.  Our food stores provide a vital social lifeline for people who otherwise have little contact with others – and we know many stories of our colleagues who have gone out of their way to look after regular customers whom they suspect to be isolated and who fail to turn up when expected at that store.  Our FuneralCare business is also at the front line in providing help to people at a time when they are particularly likely to fall into a cycle of loneliness and depression following the death of a loved one.

So it is no surprise that over the last 15 months our colleagues have really thrown themselves behind fund-raising efforts for the British Red Cross as our chosen charity partner.  We set a target of raising £3.5 million over two years, but have already exceeded £4 million and are still going strong.

But what is really exciting is that we are not planning just to hand over a cheque and let the Red Cross get on with things.  We announced yesterday that Co-op intends to really get behind the challenge of tackling loneliness in an active way:

  • Encouraging members and colleagues to volunteer for the new centres being set up by the British Red Cross across the country to reach out to people experiencing loneliness and help them to reconnect with their communities.
  • Building up local voluntary organisations in the 1500 communities around the country where Co-op has a presence, through distributing of 1% of the value of member purchases of own brand purchases.  The research indicates that getting involved in volunteering is one of the best ways of overcoming loneliness and restoring one’s sense of identity and purpose.  My hope is that we can also harness the energies of some of our 50,000 pensioners behind such groups.
  • Setting up more bereavement clubs in our funeral homes, a proven way of helping people at a key trigger point in their lives.
  • Our Insurance business is aiming to help set up 30,000 further Neighbourhood Watch groups – and encourage them not only to look out for each other’s property, but to look out for those suffering loneliness and other issues in their own communities.
  • Increasing awareness of loneliness issues among our own 70,000 colleagues.  The research ages it clear that many people in the workplace are experiencing loneliness, and that employers can do more to help. There is also a key role for us as a business to help our own colleagues prepare well for retirement – another of the key transition points that people can find difficult.

crofts-loneliness-2So this initiative is going well beyond the normal Corporate Social Responsibility raising money for good causes. It is about getting the organisation as fully behind tackling loneliness as we can. It is a great example of a full collaboration between a business and a major charity. And it is another good reason to feel proud and excited about being Co-op and the way Co-op is really re-engaging with making our communities better places for everyone.

You can find the full and summary report at: coop.co.uk/loneliness